Brexit box viral graphic fact check

A graphic about what actions have been made by the European Union and the UK, respectively, since negotiations for the UK to leave the EU began on 29 March 2017 has been shared at least 74,000 times on Facebook. The infographic makes twelve separate claims; FactCheckNI has fact checked each of them. We interpret “has” with reference to the date of action delivered, not announced. Continue reading Brexit box viral graphic fact check

Only one UK member of Facebook’s fact-checking programme?

CLAIM: The Guardian claimed that journalism charity Full Fact is “the only UK member of” Facebook’s fact-checking programme.

CONCLUSION: INACCURATE WITH CONSIDERATION. FactCheckNI is another UK member of Facebook’s third party fact-checking programme. The Guardian promptly corrected its article.
Continue reading Only one UK member of Facebook’s fact-checking programme?

Six minutes to clear security screening at George Best Belfast City Airport?

CLAIM: Since October 2018, George Best Belfast City Airport has repeated its claim that passengers pass through the security search area in an average of six minutes.

CONCLUSION: UNSUBSTANTIATED. As a private company with no regulatory requirement to share detailed information, the airport chooses not to reveal detailed data that would allow the average calculation to be substantiated over time. As a result, we can neither prove nor disprove the accuracy of the six-minute claim. Continue reading Six minutes to clear security screening at George Best Belfast City Airport?

A cross-border business transaction every 6 seconds?

CLAIM: A business transaction happens every six seconds across the border of Northern Ireland and Ireland.

CONCLUSION: INACCURATE WITH CONSIDERATION. There was a cross-border commercial vehicle journey every 6.74 seconds in 2016. But there are no known data on cross-border business transactions. Continue reading A cross-border business transaction every 6 seconds?

How-to: Wayback Machine

FactCheckNI How-to
Wayback Machine

Websites and their pages come and go. From a researcher’s perspective, it can be frustrating when you’ve cited a particular website page, only to discover later that it has been removed by the publisher or is otherwise no longer available. An American non-profit organisation, Internet Archive, launched a product in 2001 called Wayback Machine, which is a digital archive of the World Wide Web. Continue reading How-to: Wayback Machine